That will be the begining

So… there’s a lot of talk going on at the Crawford-Baker homestead lately. Jer is going back to school. He’s been planning on doing this, well, talking about doing this, for years. Im glad he’s finally decided to go ahead and take the plunge. But its got me thinking. I know I want to go back to school. I know I want to get a degree. And a masters. And maybe even a PhD. So… maybe now is the time?
I started looking at courses on Human Resources. My Dad and step-mom are both in HR and I’ve long thought that sort of job would be fitting for me.
Im a people person. I like to help. I need a career that I can help people in. I need to feel satisfied.
We were driving home from the ferry Monday morning, listening to the cbc, as civilized folks often do, when a segment called ‘the hurried child’ came on. They had a psychologist sitting in talking about parents pushing their kids before they’re ready and the effects on socialization and esteem. I thought, God, what a perfect job. You get to help, you get to be with people, and you cannot leave that job without feeling some satisfaction in what you are doing.
Anyways, long story short, I started thinking about what it would take to become a psychologist. The answer: a lot of school. Obviously.
Part of my Dad’s job is helping people in their careers: finding the right path suited to their goals and their personality. He sent me an assessment and then we sat down and went over the results, and looked at fitting career paths for me. Second from the top was a psychologist. So I started thinking. And I started looking around at schools, and my options.
So… now Im debating between a couple of schools, and a couple of routes.
Do I quit my job, and go back to school full time? Try and condense my Bachelor of Arts – Psych into two years instead of four, so I can get on to my masters asap. And then work, and then after a couple practical working years, look at getting my PhD. I will accrue a lot of debt in student loans, and we will be living a much more modest lifestyle for the next few years.
Do I start taking all my courses correspondence, while still working full time, and crawl along to the finish line in the full four years plus the masters? We will be struggling to pay our bills and tuition, but come out the other side debt-free.
Do I scrap it and take the Business and HR route? With either student loans, or distance education.

Im so excited but Im freaking right out too. Im 26 years old. Im not going to be done until Im 30, at the earliest. As Jeremy has pointed out, school is not designed for adults with bills and kids and responsibilities. But I would have never thought of this kind of change when I was 18. And maybe age is actually on my side… Would you go see a 25 year old shrink??

The bottom line is this: I want a career I am happy in. I want a career I feel like Im doing something with. I want to be able to provide Maddy with everything and anything she wants (well, within reason and without allowing her to become a spoiled brat). I want th elife that I want. And the only person I know that can make that happen, is me.

So, now… I burry my head in my ipod and lose myself in Bat for Lashes… and I weight the options. And maybe look for some advice…?

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9 Comments

Filed under health, life update

9 responses to “That will be the begining

  1. jameslrr

    Its cliche as hell but you gotta do what makes you happy, but also makes the most sense for your situation.

    Personally, it would seem that getting through all this school the both of you are wanting to partake in with the least amount of debt on the other side would make the most sense financially. Things might be different if it weren’t for things like planning a wedding and raising the kid but thats where you two are and should be damn proud of it, unfortunately it does make things a little more complicated.

    But again, you gotta do whats going to make you both happy. If you think you can handle being in debt for the next little while then you should just go for it. If that scares you guys then take your time and just take pride in the fact you are making something happen, even if its not going to go as fast as it could.

    Either way, I wish you both the best of luck.

  2. jameslrr

    Its cliche as hell but you gotta do what makes you happy, but also makes the most sense for your situation.

    Personally, it would seem that getting through all this school the both of you are wanting to partake in with the least amount of debt on the other side would make the most sense financially. Things might be different if it weren’t for things like planning a wedding and raising the kid but thats where you two are and should be damn proud of it, unfortunately it does make things a little more complicated.

    But again, you gotta do whats going to make you both happy. If you think you can handle being in debt for the next little while then you should just go for it. If that scares you guys then take your time and just take pride in the fact you are making something happen, even if its not going to go as fast as it could.

    Either way, I wish you both the best of luck.

    *Sorry if I double posted, my browser crashed I have no idea if that first one went through or if your blog asks your permission before you post comments.

  3. Caitlin

    My advice? Go for it. I would, however, advise against trying to cram a four year B.A. into two. You would probably go crazy, even if you didn’t have a kid to come home to. I think you should do it though. Like you said, it’s about making yourself happy and being in a career that you find fulfilling, rather than just one that pays the bills. You would LOVE psych courses, too. I myself have thought several times about doing my masters in psych when it comes time to further my education. And hey, what’s a little bit of debt compared to what you come out with on the other side? Sure, it’s daunting looking ahead to paying it off, but worth it in the long run. Plus, not only is finding a career path that makes you happy important for yourself, but also what a fantastic example you will be setting for your daughter. Are you looking at specific schools yet? Or just looking? Uvic has a really good psych program.

  4. My advice? Go see a career counsellor or take even one part-time course that will avail you of testing to show what your temperament points toward. Do the Myers-Briggs, at least. It will not only indicate what direction to turn, but how (and maybe, how fast). I’m a huge fan of the distance ed option, because it allows for a sense of normalcy in life. The lack of debt is another great factor, but mainly, it’s the ability to put it on hold should you want to.

    Driving yourself through a very heavy courseload with a 2-year old to get a BA in 2 years? I couldn’t ever do it. You’re not me, but that’s the main question I’d ask yourself first. School, education, all wonderful things, often regardless of what you’re studying.

    I know what ever you choose, you can do it. Look at what you’ve done already!

  5. What ever path you choose, DO IT! It’s very difficult to regret furthering your education. Actually my only regret about it is that I did it entirely with student loans instead of looking for bursaries or scholarships. Is it possible that work will help pay for some courses? You don’t have to tell them the entire story, just that you want to ‘upgrade’. If you’re still working for the gov’t I’m sure they have some programmes available!
    There are tonnes of people over 30 and 40+ that are at University. You’re hardly over the hill at 26! If anything you’ll take it more seriously than a 19yo, which will show in your grades.
    I agree with Zoeyjane. Try a couple of courses first, before jumping in head first. It may save you some money and stress in the long term.
    My biggest advice is don’t burn yourself out with too much work load. School is a LOT of work full time but it’s DEFINITELY possible. I loved going to school in the summer too, less students, instructors seem to have more fun…I’d recommend it!

    Not only is education for you, but look at the amazing example you’ll be setting for the one person that sees you and Jeremy as her entire world. 😀

  6. hi

    I am 30 yrs old and went back to college at 28ish while working full time. I was lucky enough to only need a few credits to complete my degree. I took night classes so there were many adult learners in my class, along with some fresh-out-of-high-schoolers. In January 2008 I graduated with my associate arts degree. I started working on it in September 1997. Ten years on a 2 yr degree program. I also have a friend who is 32 and in medical school – something she decided to do in her mid 20’s but didn’t get accepted into until she was 30. She will be nearly 40 by the time she has completed all her training and specialized. Don’t let age get you down. Don’t let the length of time it will take get you down. University is very accommodating to adult learners & those with families. Take night classes. Go part time. Do correspondence. Do what you gotta do whichever way is best for your family.

  7. hmmm… tough choices.
    it sounds like you’re pretty passionate about this new idea to maybe be a psychologist… i could see that being a good fit for you.
    having the both of you in school and working with the little one will no doubt be a strain; financially, emotionally and physically… but the payoff when it’s all over will be amazing. so if you’re up to the challenge, giv’er.
    i wish you guys all the luck.
    and like the previous poster said, don’t get focused on age and years it will take… it’s not going to take any less time because you put it off. better to start now than in another 5 years… or after you have more kids, right?

  8. Jen

    good for you…do it now…seems it gets harder to make these bold moves as you get older/kids get older so take the bull by the horns and kick its butt.

  9. dandystar

    if it’s any help.. camosun is a lot cheaper to start at and then transfer to a university after two years or whatever it may be.. so you may want to consider that as an option.

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